Offer patients time to believe prior to cosmetic treatments, physicians told Physicians who perform cosmetic procedures must allow clients time to think before accepting go on with treatment, according to brand-new guidance from the General Medical Council (GMC). The GMC is now seeking advice from the public and medical professionals about this and other propositions making cosmetic procedures safer. The new assistance sets out the requirements that will be expected of all UK physicians who perform cosmetic treatments, both surgical and non-surgical. It likewise intends to assist clients understand what to anticipate from their physician. Some of the bottom lines in the new assistance are that medical professionals will: The cosmetic sector is a rapidly expanding location that has gone from being a niche market to a popular service that is now widely available. But there are particular issues about patient safety and whether …
< a href=http://www.gmc-uk.org/news/26550.asp target="_ blank

“> See all stories on this topic GMC sets new standards for medical education and training A brand-new single set of standards promoting excellence and client security has been released by the General Medical Council (GMC). The requirements cover both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education and are developed to put client safety, quality of care, and fairness at the heart of the training gotten by both medical students and physicians. It also makes the functions and responsibilities of organisations delivering medical education clearer along with the requirements for teaching, supervision and support. To fulfill the GMC’s requirements, organisations will need to show they have a culture where concerns about patient security and requirements of care or training can be raised without fear of negative consequences. The requirements also highlight the importance of leadership and governance, e.
< a href=http://www.gmc-uk.org/news/26410.asp target="_ blank

“> See all stories on this subject GMC reacts to the Queen’s Speech The GMC highlights the requirement for further reform of medical regulation Niall Dickson, President of the General Medical Council, stated:’We are deeply disappointed that the government has not taken this chance to improve client security by modernising the regulation of health care experts. ‘The UK Federal government, the degenerated administrations and indeed all the primary political parties have stated their dedication to reforming our legislation to enable effective, independent regulation. The Mid-Staffordshire inquiry highlighted the vital significance of effective regulation focussed on promoting safe, thoughtful patient care rather than, as too often in the past, stepping in just after clients have been harmed. ‘In spite of all we have done to reform our services, the fact is …
< a href=http://www.gmc-uk.org/news/26408.asp target="_ blank

“> See all stories on this subject GMC requires more support for doctors in

care of the dying The General Medical Council (GMC)has promised to deal with medical schools to expand and improve training for medical students in the care of the dying. At the National Council for Palliative Care’s Dying Matters debate the GMC’s Chief Executive, Niall Dickson, argued that more needed to be done to prepare medical trainees and recently certified medical professionals to equip them to offer palliative care, and in particular to attend to the psychological aspects of looking after patients who are dying. New medical professionals, fresh out of medical school, will usually supply care for around 40 dying individuals in their first year of work. A 2014 GMC report Be prepared: are brand-new physicians safe to practice? revealed that while lots of felt well-prepared for elements such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), they were less co.
< a href=http://www.gmc-uk.org/news/28655.asp target="_ blank

“> See all stories on this subject GMC looks for views of doctors in training Doctors in training will begin participating in the world’s biggest survey of postgraduate medical education later this week (March 24). The national training survey (NTS) includes more than 50,000 physicians and is seen as a key step of the quality of medical education and training in the UK. For the first time this year the study will check out the environment in which medical professionals are trained; how relatively medical professionals feel they are being treated, and if their posts help develop self-confidence. This follows concerns raised in previous years’ survey by physicians in training over undermining and bullying. Some 8% of physicians who finished the study in 2014 said they had actually experienced bullying and simply under 14% reported seeing bullying. Niall Dickson, President of the General Medical Council, stated: …
< a href=http://www.gmc-uk.org/news/26333.asp target="_ blank

“> See all stories on this subject Student doctors could be secured of London health center emergency department A London medical facility’s accident and emergency unit is being threatened with closure on security grounds by the bodies accountable for authorizing and organising junior physicians’ training, for the first time in NHS history. The General Medical Council is so worried about the threat to the safety of clients from the shortage of senior and middle grade emergency situation physicians at North Middlesex Healthcare facility in north London that it has utilized its powers for the first time to issue a “pre-statutory letter,” warning that it could withdraw approval for junior medical professionals to be trained at the unit. The letter was sent out on 21 May to Health Education England, which arranges training posts. In the … Register for a complimentary trial to thebmj.com to get unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days. Sign u.
< a href=http://www.bing.com/news/apiclick.aspx?ref=FexRss&aid=&tid=1F317268FBB643AD8AF1F9CE0DD05C0D&url=http%3a%2f%2fwww.bmj.com%2fcontent%2f353%2fbmj.i3381&c=282715135905426273&mkt=en-gb target="_ blank

“> See all stories on this topic Research recommends how online register could be improved to

make it suitable for the future New research released today recommends how the online medical register, which notes all certified doctors eligible to work in the UK, could be enhanced making it better and available One of the commitments in   our Business Strategy 2014-2017 is to explore how the online register (which has not altered much since it was presented in 2005) can be made more accessible and beneficial for clients, companies and doctors. So   we commissioned a research study in 2014 to explore this further. The research was based on qualitative work to check out the variety of views rather than to be representative in a quantitative sense. It looked for the views of physicians, patients, employers, educators and other regulators through surveys, workshops and interviews. In addition to improvements around design …
See all stories on this topic